Cognitive Distortions

 

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted, so I thought now would be a good time. My topic for this post, as you can tell, is cognitive distortions. Basically, what this means is having a distorted view on something. They’re something we all have done from time to time. They’re not specific to just people with mental illness; however, people with mental illness may do some of these more often. This can be truly eyeopening to learn about and to remember when you need to think about something in a different light.

One of them I already mentioned in a post, All-or-Nothing Thinking. This is when you don’t see a middle ground. Everything is very good or bad, right or wrong, black or white, or giving everything you’ve got or nothing at all. The truth is everything isn’t always that clear cut. Often times as humans we see only a small portion of the picture. What we may think we want or how we should act may not always truly be right. The first example I remember doing of this cognitive distortion was in a history class. I hadn’t finished 100% of the questions on multiple homework assignments. So, instead of turning them in for 80% or even 90% I simply wouldn’t turn them in. As a result, I was close to failing when my teacher spotted a pile of my homework assignments with only one or two questions unanswered sitting in my textbook. It brought my grade from a D to a high B.

Another is Overgeneralization, which means interpreting a single event as part of a never-ending cycle. A prime example of this, that I have used, is the phrase “you always” or “you never”. Most commonly used for me when talking to my mom. Taking one small thing and seeing at as a repeating pattern.

Next, how about jumping to conclusions. Basically assuming things without any clear evidence or facts. I know I’ve been guilty of this a time or two. For instance, with one of my therapist I assumed she was making a certain judgment of me and there was no clear evidence or facts to support it. I still don’t know that my conclusions weren’t accurate, but I at least needed to try and see things from her point of view.

Another one, that I’m very guilty of, is emotional reasoning. Believing just because you feel something emotionally it must be true. An example of this is often found in OCD. With I feel this is a threat/ danger, therefore it must be as big of threat/danger or as likely to happen as I think. I can tell you in the case of OCD this is extremely debilitating.

You are probably all getting bored and getting the idea, so how about I wrap this up. This is just a few of the cognitive distortions there are feel free to look up more of them on other websites. The explanations of these I just posted are all in my own words for the most part. So, I hope they’re understandable

You are probably all getting bored and getting the idea, so how about I wrap this up. This is just a few of the cognitive distortions there are feel free to look up more of them on other websites. The explanations of these I just posted are all in my own words for the most part. So, I hope they’re understandable.

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